Aug 222012
 
Review of Golf Wedges

The mid season update of Review and Comparison of Golf Wedges has been completed. A couple of sets that were being discontinued have been removed from the comparison. As you will see, the Dynacraft DMC forged wedges narrowly beat out the Acer XB wedges. In our comparison, we do not compare wedges that are part of a complete set. We only compare makes/models that are available as individual wedges only or as sets of wedges.  

Nov 142011
 
Review of Golf Wedges

Most people when starting out, go to a golf store or department store and buy a set of golf clubs. Such sets usually have a pitching wedge and that’s it. Later on, people add a sand wedge and that’s about it. Over the years as their game improves, they start understanding the value of the short game. Some of them read a good book like Dave Pelz’s Short Game Bible and really start appreciating the value of the short game. After all, 63% of golf shots are within 100 yards of the green and that is where you need wedges. An ideal golf set would have four wedges, a pitching wedge, a gap wedge, sand wedge and a lob wedge. Dave Pelz is a strong proponent of the 4×3 method. Under the 4 x 3 method, you use a set of four wedges at three different power levels, 7:30, 9:00. and 10:30 to give you three precise shots, thus 4 x 3 = 12 shots. You write these shots on a tape and stick it to each club. Next time you are within 100 yards, you check your yardage and see which club and which shot gives you the best chance of getting close to the pin. The next thing is to figure out which golf wedges to buy. You would like to read a review of golf wedges and compare one set of wedges to another but there aren’t that many golf wedges reviews. So we decided to do [Read More …]

Aug 122011
 

The big Pooh-bahs of golf thought the modern day golfers are just bomb and gouge players and they needed to be reigned in. Maybe they were making the old timers look not so good. So they decided to change the rules on how deep the grooves of a wedge can be. Let’s see how these guys make par when they miss the green. Let’s see them squirm when their wedge shots fly over the green. So all professional golfers were made to switch to the new groove conforming wedges in 2010. The result: In 2009, 57.5% of the time Pro’s who missed the green made Par or better. In 2010, 57.4%. So much for all that. The winners – wedge manufacturers. Those amateurs who wanted to comply with the new USGA rule dumped their old wedges for the new ones. Those who couldn’t care less for USGA rules hoarded up on the non-complying wedges as manufacturers weren’t allowed to make them after December 31, 2010. For the average weekend golfer, if you are happy with your wedges, don’t buy new ones unless you have worn out your grooves. The USGA doesn’t mind if you play with the new or old grooves for another 10 years – most of you don’t care anyway. If you really want to improve your short game, what can really help you is better technique. Get your hands on a copy of Dave Pelz’s Short Game Bible and practice what he preaches. That’s the best way [Read More …]

Aug 082011
 

Most golfers start off with a pitching wedge and a sand wedge and even those quite often are from different makes with no relationship to each other. As agolfers knowledge of the game improves, he realizes that the short game needs tobe paid attention to. 63% of a golfer’s shots are within 100 yards of the green.If your short game is great, you can hit your approach shot close to the pin andhave a very good chance at birdie or par. A good short game is the best recipefor lower scores. Dave Pelz, the short game evangelist and author of the book ‘SHORT GAME BIBLE‘ is a proponent of the 4×3 method. Great book. Ifyou haven’t read it, you are missing a great resource. Under the 4 x 3 method,you use a set of four wedges at three different power levels, 7:30, 9:00 and10:30 to give you three precise shots, thus 4 x 3 = 12 shots. You write youryardages with theseshots on a tape and stick it to each wedge. Next time you are within 100 yards,you check your yardage and see which wedge and which shot gives you the bestchance of getting close to the pin. If the clock reference confuses you, think of yourself as a clock. In addressposition with your club head resting behind the ball, you are at 6:00 o’clock.7:30 would mean a very short backswing and your wrists cocked. 9:00 would bearms parallel to the ground and the wrists fully cocked. And so on with [Read More …]